An exhibition to tackle gender stereotyping on the NEOMA Business School Campus in Reims

At this particular moment in time, the words "Careers have no sex!" is just an assertion. Because, even today, there are still certain professional fields that are the almost exclusive domain of either men or women.
To contribute to tackling gender stereotyping, which hinders the recruitment of women, in particular, in scientific and technical professions, NEOMA Business School hosted a regional event organized by Accustica on its campus in Reims on November 13. The event was open to everyone, particularly schoolchildren in the Champagne region, with the aim of questioning preconceived ideas by providing a scientific persepctive.

 

This event included a variety of talks and was the first of a touring exhibition entitled "Girls, dare to study science!" that will cover the entire Grand-Est region. The day’s special guest was Catherine Vidal, neurobiologist, brain specialist, honorary director at the Institut Pasteur in Paris and exhibition patron.

Does the brain have a sex?

Before the official inauguration of "Girls, dare to study science!", Catherine Vidal gave a lecture entitled "Does the brain have a sex?" aimed at understanding the role biology, but also the socio-cultural environment, plays in the construction of our identities as girls and boys, women and men.

This is a highly topical issue. Because if management schools like NEOMA Business School are on an equal footing in terms of the number of boy and girl students they have, the students' choices are still very gender-oriented.

“There are more girls in marketing specialisations and more boys in finance. And when it comes to entrepreneurship, the vast majority of entrepreneurs are men. Globally, only 3% of venture capital funds are invested in start-ups headed by women!” explains Delphine Manceau, Dean, NEOMA BS. “At NEOMA, we have a very active policy, that includes courses dedicated to the fight against unconscious stereotyping. Several of our Professors are conducting research on these themes. The school also has a ‘Gender Equality Unit’ that raises student awareness on respect for the opposite sex and the fight against sexual harassment in the student environment, plus the ‘He For She’ student association, which is very active on our campuses. I am a strong believer in education and it is particularly the role of Business Schools to raise awareness among their students, some of whom will become marketing directors, to make them aware of their social responsibility in tomorrow's world.

A number of pitches and testimonies from women scientists and business leaders also provided additional insights into the obstacles that prevent women, in particular, from embarking on scientific and technical careers.

The exhibition included a number of highly successful discussion stands, board games, interactive booths and workshops.

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